Monday, July 16, 2007

Dashboard Confessional

How did these no-talent excuses for musicians get to be so popular? I could play better music myself on a ukelele. What happened to rock music? I can't think of a single decent new band except for the White Stripes.

I also have no interest in Radiohead. I don't understand why people like them. Nor do I think much of Wilco.

I like a lot of music, a lot of rock, a lot of rap, jazz, classical, and even country and bluegrass, but it seems like rock has fallen off a cliff into total patheticness. Still, there are plenty of groups putting out good music, but most of them have been around for quite a while. Then again, I am probably just not hooked into the vibe any more. Live music is not my thing.

I guess there is always Devin the Dude and Bus Driver.

6 comments:

Reid said...

Dashboard Confessional was originally a solo project of Chris Carabba's, who also used to be the lead singer for Further Seems Forever. Back when I first saw him play a small bar in Boulder, Colorado (2001ish), he completely amazed me and about 150 other people, a large portion of which were tatooed punk rockers. And that's the funny thing. Chris had built a really cool grassroots following with his incredible ability to play the accoustic guitar and sing about things that a lot (if not all) guys can relate to. Heartbreak mainly. But to watch him sit on stage by himself and scream his lungs out while strumming like a madman...it's was impressive. And I was a big fan.

Fast forward to 2007, and yeah, Dashboard Confessional pretty much sucks. Chris picked up a band (no doubt at the advice of his label), and toned things down. Smoother, less angst, more heartbreak, but now in a defeated, almost pathetic way. Soon it was his cooing and good looks that gained him a following, this time consisting mainly of 16 year old girls. I saw DC twice more after that first great show in Boulder (once in Denver, once in Vegas, both in 2002) and both shows were disappointing. Not to mention all of the commercial spots, sponsorships, etc. The DC that I and a lot of other people enjoyed and respected is gone. I don't throw the term "sellout" around very often because I think people overuse and missunderstand it, but I think Chris sold out, absolutely. Maybe I would too...who knows? But whenever someone brings DC up, I make sure to tell them about the "old days" when it was just Chris and his guitar.
Oh and uhhhh, White Stripes are not a new band. Not sure where you got that, but let's be realistic here. :)

chris farrell said...

Thanks for the info. White Stripes are new compared to, say, REM. It's all relative, and ancient things can seem new when you're as old as me.

chris farrell said...

I guess I was thinking of "new" as "anything post-1990".... but anyway....by that definition I'm sure there are tons of great new bands, but I can't think of any. That would include Nirvana, who were in a class of their own.....

chris farrell said...

I mostly still listen to rock from the sixties and seventies now, which was old even when I was in college. (late eighties, early nineties).

Strayer said...

Chris, I still listen to 60's and 70's rock also. I like rock. I don't like the new styles much, guess because I'm old and grew up a rock lover.

If you happen on to any great new rock bands, clue me in, would you? I'd love to update.

I see new bands who imitate old bands and in my mind, that's pathetic. Means they can't develop their own winning style.

chris farrell said...

I will let you know if I find anything.